erthtone:

Waiting for that feeling.
© Arnold R. Butler.2014 (www.ab2ether.com)

erthtone:

Waiting for that feeling.

© Arnold R. Butler.2014
(www.ab2ether.com)

explore-blog:

For Sherwood Anderson's birthday, his spectacular letter of advice on art and life to his teenage son

reportagebygettyimages:

'The traditional funding model, of agencies and magazines pushing money at photographers to do projects, is not what it used to be. Photographers these days have to explore all avenues to try to get enough money to continue their projects, and grants are a very important part of that.'

-Jon Jones, Sunday Times Magazine Director of Photography and Getty Images Editorial Grant judge

2014 marks the ten year anniversary of the Getty Images Grants program, which has now awarded over $1 million in funding to photographers. In this video, some of the winners and judges of the Editorial Grant reflect on their experiences with the program and why it is so important to photojournalists.

notesondesign:

ponder

notesondesign:

ponder

theatlantic:

Why Every Book About Africa Has the Same Cover

Last week, Africa Is a Country, a blog that documents and skewers Western misconceptions of Africa, ran a fascinating story about book design. It posted a collage of 36 covers of books that were either set in Africa or written by African writers. The texts of the books were as diverse as the geography they covered: Nigeria, Zimbabwe, South Africa, Botswana, Zambia, Mozambique. They were written in wildly divergent styles, by writers that included several Nobel Prize winners. Yet all of books’ covers featured an acacia tree, an orange sunset over the veld, or both.
"In short," the post said, "the covers of most novels ‘about Africa’ seem to have been designed by someone whose principal idea of the continent comes from The Lion King.”
Read more. [Image: Wikimedia Commons]

theatlantic:

Why Every Book About Africa Has the Same Cover

Last week, Africa Is a Country, a blog that documents and skewers Western misconceptions of Africa, ran a fascinating story about book design. It posted a collage of 36 covers of books that were either set in Africa or written by African writers. The texts of the books were as diverse as the geography they covered: Nigeria, Zimbabwe, South Africa, Botswana, Zambia, Mozambique. They were written in wildly divergent styles, by writers that included several Nobel Prize winners. Yet all of books’ covers featured an acacia tree, an orange sunset over the veld, or both.

"In short," the post said, "the covers of most novels ‘about Africa’ seem to have been designed by someone whose principal idea of the continent comes from The Lion King.”

Read more. [Image: Wikimedia Commons]

La fois où j’ai essayé de monter sur un cheval sans selle dans l’océan. 

La fois où j’ai essayé de monter sur un cheval sans selle dans l’océan. 

DOING THE BEST AT THIS MOMENT PUTS YOU IN THE BEST PLACE FOR THE NEXT MOMENT.
OPRAH WINFREY

shortformblog:

parislemon:

Yes, that’s Tim Cook narrating. As Rene Ritchie notes:

My best guess as to why Tim Cook narrated the “Better” video is because it speaks to Apple’s core values, and speaking to Apple’s core values is both deeply important to Tim Cook, and how he’s been positioned atop and within Apple.

You can say Tim Cook is not a product guy, but there’s no question that he knows better than anyone how Apple does what it does. And because he cares about it, he’s made that process… better.

This feels like the point where Tim Cook finally drew the line in the sand and showed what Apple looks like under his image. He’s been moving in this direction for a while, but unlike prior efforts, this doesn’t feel like Steve Jobs’ Apple under new ownership. This has Cook’s fingerprints all over it. More power to him.

Dans les voûtes hantées d’Édimbourg. Je n’aime pas les histoires de fantômes. 

new-aesthetic:

Twitter / contagious: “Hmm, nobody is clicking our banner ads. Let’s try them on print. (via @spencerholladay)”

new-aesthetic:

Twitter / contagious: “Hmm, nobody is clicking our banner ads. Let’s try them on print. (via @spencerholladay)”